Who is guilty?

Palesa Deejay Manaleng
torture
Torture has been used throughout history to extract false or true confessions from ‘wrongdoers/criminals’. People would be brutalized and degraded, maybe it was because they were viewed as less than human.

injections ruth

Unfortunately people are still being tortured to this day, in prisons around the world. The reports by Ruth Hopkins on torture at Mangaung prison, where inmates spoke of electric shocks and fighting against being forcefully medicated with psychotic drugs. Complaints of broken bones and even serious injuries while in custody are not isolated South African stories.
Here are more torture stories from around the world:
CIA made doctors torture suspected terrorists after 9/11, taskforce finds

CIA made doctors torture suspected terrorists after 9/11, taskforce finds
A report shows that doctors and psychologists working for the US military violated the ethical codes of their profession under instruction from the defence department and the CIA to become involved in the torture and degrading treatment of suspected terrorists.

China Supreme Court rules out confession through torture
“Inquisition by torture used to extract a confession, as well as the use of cold, hunger, drying, scorching, fatigue and other illegal methods to obtain confessions from the accused must be eliminated” the Supreme Court said.

‘Tamils still being raped and tortured’ in Sri Lanka
Allegations of rape and torture by the Sri Lankan security forces have emerged, some of them occurring four years after the civil war ended.

Suspect accuses police of torture
Mr Adan Abdikadir Dheq Adan, a Madrassa teacher, in an affidavit filed in court, accused the government of criminalising him over a crime he never committed.

Egyptian journalists launch new watchdog against torture
On 3 November, MBC Masr television channel revealed on its websites that its Minya correspondent Islam Fathi was Tortured and beaten repeatedly by police.

Advertisements

About witsjusticeproject
The Wits Justice Project combines journalism, advocacy, law and education to make the criminal justice system work better for all.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: