National and international criminal justice stories making news

Criminal Justice

Image taken from http://thadmyerslaw.com/

Charges Against Senzo Meyiwa Murder Accused Withdrawn

“The case against Zanokuhle Mbatha, the only man arrested in connection with the murder of soccer star Senzo Meyiwa has been withdrawn. The accused did not appear in the Boksburg Magistrates Court this morning as he was being protected from the media and public view.”

Cape cops in court for corruption

“Ten Western Cape police officials, based at the Parow police station in Cape Town, appeared in the Bellville District Court on Monday. The officials, who were arrested at the weekend, face eight charges of corruption each, with the amounts involved totalling in excess of R10 000. State advocate Max Orban, of the Bellville Specialised Commercial Crime Court, alleges that on various occasions last year, they falsely informed victims that drugs had been found on their business premises, and demanded the immediate payment of fines to avoid arrest.”

New witness expected in Dewani trail

“A new witness is expected to be called on Tuesday as the trial of British businessman Shrien Dewani continues in the Western Cape High Court. On Monday, the court heard from a hotel receptionist of how two important phone calls took place around an alleged plot to kill Dewani’s wife Anni Dewani.”

Four wrongfully convicted men, four very different outcomes

“According to the Innocence Project, it takes exonerees three years on average to receive any compensation after their release. More than a quarter get nothing. Among those who are paid, 81 percent get less than $50,000 for each year of wrongful imprisonment. NewsHour spoke to a number of exonerated men from different states about their experiences reintegrating post-release. All of them, regardless of compensation, say they would pay anything to have the years they lost in prison back.”

 

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About witsjusticeproject
The Wits Justice Project combines journalism, advocacy, law and education to make the criminal justice system work better for all.

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